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A Strategy for Conservation of the Tibetan Gazelle
Improving Food Security and Livelihood of Mountain People Through Development of Agriculture
 
The challenges in the Himalayan region - from melting glaciers and deforestation,to lack of education and healthcare, and geopolitics of a sensitive region that spans the borders of several countries.
The Himalayan region for the rest of the world is a beautiful, pristine land, a bounteous, haven of peace and happiness. For the adventure-seeker, it is a challenging physical feature to be conquered, for the naturalist, a treasurehouse of flora and fauna to be studied, and for the culture-seeker, a source of spiritual upliftment and aesthetic pleasure. While the Himalayas are undoubtedly a canvas on which nature and culture have splashed their hues in abundance and with the boldest of strokes, and although the Himalayan people can teach the world many a lesson in joyous living and dealing with adversity, the region is among the most disadvantaged and challenged. As the external world changes, in climate, technology, values, practices, the positive impacts of development have missed the Himalayan people, leaving stark gaps between these areas and the plains. On the other hand, the negative effects of development, such as degradation and depletion of natural resources, war and conflict, disease, have been magnified, in this vulnerable region and on its inhabitants. The readings in this section would expose the reader to the major issues and problems that beset this fragile world of the Himalayas.
 
Sustainable development and management of water resource in mountain
ecosystem: Some examples from Sikkim Himalaya
by V. Khawas
The State of Sikkim is a small geographical entity located in the Eastern Indian Himalayan Mountain System. Completely landlocked and criss-crossed by green valleys, high peaks and rippling rivers the region is bounded on the north by China (Tibetan Plateau), Bhutan and Tibetan Plateau on the east, Nepal on the west and the Darjeeling Hills of West Bengal on the south. The entire Sikkim Himalaya is a part of the youngest and loftiest mountain system of the world "the Himalaya" and hence is characterized with highly folded and faulted rock strata at many places. Covering just 0.2 percent of the country the state is characterized with formidable physical features. It presents a compound landscape because the complexity of geomorphic evolution has played an important role in the development of the existing topography. Starting at the foot with a meager elevation of less than 300 meters it stretches up to as high as 8550 meters above the mean sea level. The hills rise abruptly from the plains and the elevation increases northward and northwestward.
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Cultural diversity in the mountains
by M. Mehta
Over the last two decades the mountain systems of the world have received considerable attention from the development and environment communities. Since 1990 this interest has received an impetus with the establishment of the IUCN Commission on Mountain Protected Areas and the inclusion of Article 13 (Fragile Mountain Environments) of Agenda 21 at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). Today there is growing awareness at policy, research and activist levels that the well-being of lowland areas is intricately connected to the sustainable conservation of highland regions. In addition to their rich biodiversity, mountains also contain a diversity of cultures, subsistence types and traditions. This tremendous variety has emerged as an evolutionary response to the niche-specificity of steep mountainous topographies, their inherent...
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The challenges of mountain environments
Environment and rural development in Darjeeling Himalaya
Improving Food Security and Livelihood of Mountain People Through Development of Agriculture
 
The Himalayan Dilemma
byJack D Ives and Bruno Messerli
This book seeks to examine the basis of the widely supported prediction that the Himalayan region is inevitably drifting into a situation of environmental super crisis and collapse...
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Gift of the Himalayas
Nepal Himalaya
A Sketch of the Geography and Geology of the Himalaya Mountains and Tibet
 
The Water Demand and Supply Survey
by J. Merz, et al.
The publication describes community water management as an in creasingly important tool for management of this increasingly scarce and polluted resource. The study explores water resource dynamics in two watersheds in the middle mountains of...
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Impact of Climate Change on Himalayan Glaciers and Glacial Lakes
The Melting Himalayas
A Matter of Quality
 
A Matter of Quality
in Welfare and Infrastructure Issues
The study by SIDH shows a gap between what parents expected the school to teach their children in terms of values, ethics, behavior, character building etc and what the schools were actually teaching in rural and urban areas of Uttarakhand. The research, originally designed...
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Mountain Tourism: A Boon or Bane?
in Social Issues
Among mountain populations, women play a crucial role in natural resource management, agricultural production, tourism, well-being and the very survival of mountain families, but they are more undernourished, under-compensated for their labor and under-represented...
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A Strategy for Conservation of the Tibetan Gazelle
in Mountain Themes
Tibetan gazelle (Procapra picticaudata) is endemic to the Tibetan plateau. Although its conservation status is believed to be secure, the study initiated...
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Mountain Themes
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Dreams and Aspirations in Voices Gallery

Nisha Devi
Keylong, Lahaul & Spiti, Himachal Pradesh
India

"My dream is to see all round development of my region, and working towards achieving this goal is my ambition. To fulfill my dreams and ambitions, I feel we need to elect a good representative who can..."
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Himalayan Fauna
in Natural Resources Databases

Black-necked crane

The black-necked crane, Grus nigricollis, also known as the Tibetan crane, is a tall lanky bird, around 135 cm long, with a wingspan of 2-2.5 m and a weight of 6-8 kg. It is a whitish-gray crane with black head, neck, and tail plumage.
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Databases
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Facts on Himalayan Ecology
Soils of the Himalayas
The soils found in the Himalayas are diverse in character depending upon altitude, vegetation cover, slope, structure and stage. The major soil groups in the Himalayas are brown hill soil, sub-mountain soils, mountain meadow soil and red loamy soils, apart from other...
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Environmental Issues- Climate Change, Desertification and Disasters: The Himalayas are under threat! Deforestation is laying vast stretches barren, several rare and endemic species are threatened with extinction, and droughts & floods are recurrent phenomena. The Himalayan region has been declared a ‘Biodiversity Hotspot’. Although astoundingly rich in natural wealth, it has lost 70% of its original habitat and its flora and fauna are in grave danger. Several species have probably been lost to the world forever, and the populations of several others are rapidly reducing, threatened both by anthropogenic impacts and climate change...
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Welfare & Infrastructure Issues:There is massive deprivation in terms of all the basic amenities that characterize the modern life, such as health, education, potable water, sanitation and other infrastructure interventions for general welfare. The situation has got further aggravated by the remoteness and poor connectivity of these regions, with the sparse population here getting hugely marginalized in the overall development process. This section seeks to explore all these issues pertaining to exclusion and marginalization, conflict and geopolitics, migration, gender disparity and appropriate welfare interventions in the Himalayan regions...
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Social Issues, Gender, Indigenous Rights:The Himalayan communities live in a society greatly influenced by the variations in topography and climate, which impose harsh living conditions and tend to restrict movement and communication. This has been a boon in disguise for the local communities, as their isolation from the world has helped them retain the purity and sanctity of their cultural identities. However, there is a visible change in this scenario with the improvements in the local transportation and communication infrastructure. These developments are bringing these hitherto remote areas in close contact with the outside world, thereby affecting the age old social and cultural practices of the high Himalayan regions...
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Poverty and Resource Issues:The Himalayan region is blessed with extensive natural resources, such as wide arable lands, vast grassland and forest, a rich reserve of mineral deposits and multiple rivers offering a huge potential for waterpower development. The sources of livelihoods differ across the Himalayas, with the principal activities in the high altitude Himalayas limited to animal husbandry and subsistence farming. However, the burgeoning population has resulted in a great stress on the traditional economic system. Moreover, unplanned deforestation to make room for agriculture has largely disrupted the more-or-less self-sufficient system that the local communities were originally used to...
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Geo-politics:A key reason for the limited opportunities in the mountainous regions lies in their geo-strategic sensitivity. A number of these regions overlap with the national boundaries, thus bringing those areas under constant military scrutiny. Every new project/industry needs to be scrutinized in the light of national security, thus significantly narrowing the scope of new industrial growth. In the abstract, geopolitics traditionally indicates the links and causal relationships between political power and geographic space; in concrete terms it is often seen as a body of thought assaying specific strategic prescriptions based on the relative importance of land power and sea power in world history... The geopolitical tradition had some consistent concerns, like the geopolitical correlates of power in world politics, the identification of international core areas, and the relationships between naval and terrestrial capabilities.—Oyvind Osterud, "The Uses and Abuses of Geopolitics", Journal of Peace Research, no. 2, 1988, p. 192...
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