Himalayan VOICES High Himalaya FORUM Himalayan Heritage  
 
Search
 
 > Geography
 
 
GEOGRAPHY
Title: River Systems of the Himalayas
The sources of the Himalayan rivers lie in the melting snow and glaciers, which explains the constant flow of these rivers throughout the year. There are 19 major river systems that drain the Himalayas. The waters of these rivers have important economic, social and environmental significance for people living in the Himalayas as well as the vast plains that are drained by the rivers. The two largest river systems have been described below: The Indus River System, which is mainly fed by glaciers in the Himalayas, the Hindu Kush and the Karakoram originates near Lake Mansarovar in Tibet, runs through Ladakh (in Jammu & Kashmir, where it meets the river Zanskar) and the northern areas of Gilgit-Baltistan, finally draining into the Arabian Sea off the coast of Karachi (Pakistan The principal tributaries of the Indus are Jhelum, Chenab, Ravi, Beas and Sutlej. The Indus is the third largest river in the Indian subcontinent in terms of annual flow...
  read more...
Title: Notable passes of the Himalayan range
In a mountain range, a pass is the ‘saddle-point’ between regions of higher elevations that allow easy passage through the range. Many of them have roads constructed over them to facilitate transport. The rugged terrains of the Himalayas present a formidable barrier to all travelers and explorers. Thus, the passes have played...
  read more...
Title: Glaciers and Lakes of the Himalayas
Lakes The Himalayan region is covered by hundreds of lakes that can be classified according to the altitude they are found at. Most of the lakes are located at altitudes of less than 5,000 m, with their sizes decreasing with an increase in altitude. Some of the important lower and middle altitudinal lakes are found in Kumaon (Nainital,...
  read more...
Title: Notable peaks of the Himalayan range
The Himalayas are the highest mountain range in the world. Nine of the fourteen highest peaks in the world fall within the range, while the remaining peaks belong to the neighbouring ranges like Karakoram. These are commonly referred to as the “Eight-thousanders” as they tower above eight thousand...
  read more...
Title: Origin of the Himalayas
The Himalayas, along with their neighbouring ranges, the Karakoram, Pamir and Hindu Kush are one of the youngest mountains in the world. Millions of years ago, a vast shallow ocean called the Tethys Sea existed where the Himalayas stand today. The formation of the Himalayan ranges was the result of a collision between the Indian plate...
  read more...
Title: Geology of the Himalayas
The Himalayas are one of the youngest mountain systems of the world, formed by collision of the Indo-Australian and the Eurasian tectonic plates millions of years ago. Based on geology and structure, the Himalaya may be divided into four longitudinal belts, the Siwalik Hills, the Lesser Himalayas, the Higher Himalayas and the...
  read more...